Happy Hour Tuesday: Rometti Sidecar

Rometti Limoncello Happy Hour Tuesday Rometti Sidecar

Happy Hour Tuesday!

There is a drink that talks about the 1920s, about an effervescent Parisian life that after World War I, started to transform into a modern, emancipated and more enjoyable lifestyle especially for the middle class, who for the first time was finally able to have fun and gather in places such as Music-halls, circuses and operettas as much as the aristocrats. Although the War with the lost of the beloved ones had a deep moral impact on the French, becoming in contact with different cultures helped the French society to open their mind and embrace a great variety of lifestyles.

It is in the middle of this social and cultural revolution that in Paris, at the Ritz Hotel (where Ritz is often associated to the term ritzy, “sumptuous, luxurious”), a drink called Sidecar in honor of an American Captain who used to ride a motorcycle with sidecar seems to have originated.

There are other theories that link the origin of this drink to the Buck’s Club in London, what is sure is that it appears for the first time in 1922 Harry MacElhone’s Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails and later on in 1948 David A. Embury’s The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. In this last work the author mentions the American Captain, although it refers to the Harry’s Bar in Paris rather than to the Hotel Ritz.

Whatever the trusty is, Sidecar eventually became incredibly popular in England and France. It appears to be usually made in Paris with  equal parts of Cognac, Cointreau and Lemon Juice, while in England Cognac is used in two parts, Cointreau and Lemon in one. We at Rometti decided to give it a try and add a splash of Rometti Limocello instead of lemon juice, and lemon zest to top it off.

Every sip of Rometti Sidecar enlightens us with a taste of fanciness and joy accompanied by the glory of a hero of another time and place. And if you close your eyes, you might still hear the sound of the American Captain’s motorcycle cruising down the avenue.

Ingredients: 

1/3 oz Cognac 

1/3 oz Cointreau

1/3 oz Rometti Limoncello

Lemon Zest to garnish

In a shaker filled with ice combine Cognac, Cointreau, Lemon Juice and Rometti Limoncello. Shake well and pour into a martini cocktail, garnish with lemon zest or lemon peel.

~Enjoy!

Image from http://www.mylusciouslife.com

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Happy Hour Tuesday: Sorrentini

Rometti Limoncello Happy Hour Tuesday Sorrentini

Happy Hour Tuesday!

Vacation, vacation.. it’s the end of July, and it seems like a lot of people have left town lately to spend time with the family before the end of school break. Regardless of the recession, I know of many lucky ones that have a trip to overseas planned just ’round the corner. If you, dear Reader, are fortunate enough to be able to get away towards a European country, you will probably want to make a stop in the beautiful Sorrento, Italy, the land of limoncello, and if it wasn’t in your plans it should be!

Sorrento is a charming town that raises on top of limestone tuff cliffs, in a way that seems to flow, thus the name Sorrento, from a Greek word that means “flowing“.
Located just Southern than Napoli, Sorrento is connected to Amalfi through the Strada Statale 163, better known as the Amalfi Drive, a stretch of road runs along the coast of the Tyrrhenian Sea. Sorrento has an incredibly rich history that starts from the Corinthians and continues through the Roman Empire, the Goths and the Byzantines. The signs of history are still very much readable throughout the city, which is characterized by medieval streets, Roman ruins an blooming terraces. If you wanter why there are watch towers along the coast, it’s because back in the 16th century Pirates coming from the Harbor of Pisa used to sack the town of Sorrento, which today is richer than ever with orange, lemon, and olive trees.

This week’s drink is a praise to this wonderful city, from which it takes the name: Sorrentini. This version of limoncello martini uses Cointreau, a French orange-flavored triple sec which adds a little tanginess to the drink.

Here’s to Sorrento the birthplace of Limoncello! Salute!

Ingredients:
100 ml Vodka
50 ml Cointreau liqueur
100 ml Rometti Limoncello
25 ml Martini
40 ml fresh lemon juice (1 lemon)
25 ml sugar-water
ice

Juice the lemon. Set the lemon juice aside. Fill 3 martini glasses with ice. In a cocktail shaker mix vodka, Cointreau, Rometti Limoncello, martini, fresh lemon juice and sugar-water with ice.

~Enjoy!

Recipe and image from http://www.marthafied.com

Happy Hour Tuesday SPECIAL: Paloma

Rometti Limoncello Happy Hour Tuesday Paloma National Tequila Day

Happy Tequila Day, folks!

Although some of you might be celebrating National Tequila Day this coming weekend, we still wanted to share with you a delicious recipe that uses this incredibly popular drink: Paloma (Spanish for dove). But before we get into the cocktail, here is a little bit of history on tequila.

Jalisco is the state of birth for tequila, which takes the name from the town where this distilled spirit was created back in the 16th century (although Guatalajara was the first place where the today-known tequila was made). This state, together with some limited areas in other regions is the only place where tequila can be produced from distillation of the blue agave plant. Blue agave is only one of the 136 agave species, however when this particular one is used, tequila gets to be called with its own name! Believe it or not, the Aztec already used this plant to ferment a spirit called octli, a sort of ancestor to tequila. It’s to the Aztec that the “Pasion Azteca” tequila takes its name from. “Pasion Azteca” has a bottle made of platinum and diamonds, which make it the most expensive tequila bottle in the world!
Today agave is present in tequila in 100% or 51% or more (called mixtos) in conjunction with sugars. Blanco (or else called plata) contains 100% agave tequila, thus its taste is bolder. Other types of tequila, Reposado, Anejo, both aged in oak barrels respectively for less than a year and more than a year but less than three, have a more complex taste but also smoother than the tequila made of 100% agave. There is then Joven, which is a mixto, thus lighter.

Tequila is often used alone for shots, or with other ingredients to make mixed drinks. Either way, tequila if moderately consumed has been known to stimulate the nervous system. And, if it’s a good quality tequila, hangovers are pretty much non-existent!

Paloma is a popular drink in Mexico due to its fruity and smooth flavor. Blanco tequila is often used for this drink (although some recipes use a Reposed type of tequila); the other main ingredient is grapefruit soda, which gives it a little bitterness together with freshness. The drink is a perfect blend of different tastes, from sweet to salty, from citrusy to bitter.

Ingredients:
2 oz blanco or reposado tequila
6 oz fresh grapefruit soda
1/2 oz Rometti Limoncello
Salt for rimming (optional)
Rim a collins glass with salt. Fill the glass with ice and add the tequila and Rometti Limoncello. Top it off with grapefruit soda.

~Enjoy!

recipe from cocktails.about.com
image from drizzleanddip.com

Cook N Bake British Series: Beef Wellington

Rometti Limoncello Cook N Bake British Series Beef WEllington

If you are one of those people that love to learn the history of a dish, you will find particularly interesting this week’s dish: Beef Wellington, one of the most known English culinary trademarks.
Wrapped in puff party, Beef Wellington is nothing less than a baked tenderloin coated with pate’ and duxelles, sometimes with the addition of spices.

The name of Wellington seems to be linked to the 1st Duke of Wellington, Arthur Wellesley, who seemed to love beef, wine, pate’ and mushrooms. It’s also possible that more than a connection to his love for food, the dish was named Wellington because it was shaped like a military boot that the Duke used to wear. However like it often happens with drinks and dishes that became so popular that anyone wanted to claim their origin, there are other theories of how it generated, such as a variation of the French filet de boeuf in croute adapted for the English, or the use of this dish for parties and receptions in New Zealand. All of the mystery, of course, just contributes to increase the curiosity and appreciation of this dish.

Beef Wellington is not so easy to make, the tenderloin needs to be rare-roasted and before baking it needs to be coated with pate’ and duxelles. It’s better to bake it whole in order to retain most of the juice, but if preferred it can be sliced prior to baking and cook in individual portions.

If you like your tenderloin with lots of flavor, curry, ginger, allspice can be added to Beef Wellington.

Ingredients:

a good beef fillet (preferably Aberdeen Angus) of around 1kg/2lb 4oz
3 tbsp olive oil
250g/ 9oz chestnut mushroom, include some wild ones if you like
50g/ 2oz butter
1 large sprig fresh thyme
100ml/ 3½ fl oz dry white wine
12 slices prosciutto
500g/1lb 2oz pack puff pastry, thawed if frozen
a little flour, for dusting
2 egg yolks beaten with 1 tsp water

Heat oven to 220C/fan 200C/gas 7. Sit the 1kg beef fillet on a roasting tray, brush with 1 tbsp olive oil and season with pepper, then roast for 15 mins for medium-rare or 20 mins for medium. When the beef is cooked to your liking, remove from the oven to cool, then chill in the fridge for about 20 mins.
While the beef is cooling, chop 250g chestnut (and wild, if you like) mushrooms as finely as possible so they have the texture of coarse breadcrumbs. You can use a food processor to do this, but make sure you pulse-chop the mushrooms so they don’t become a slurry.
Heat 2 tbsp of the olive oil and 50g butter in a large pan and fry the mushrooms on a medium heat, with 1 large sprig fresh thyme, for about 10 mins stirring often, until you have a softened mixture. Season the mushroom mixture, pour over 100ml dry white wine and cook for about 10 mins until all the wine has been absorbed. The mixture should hold its shape when stirred. Remove the mushroom duxelle from the pan to cool and discard the thyme.
Overlap two pieces of cling film over a large chopping board. Lay 12 slices prosciutto on the cling film, slightly overlapping, in a double row. Spread half the duxelles over the prosciutto, then sit the fillet on it and spread the remaining duxelles over. Use the cling film’s edges to draw the prosciutto around the fillet, then roll it into a sausage shape, twisting the ends of cling film to tighten it as you go. Chill the fillet while you roll out the pastry.
Dust your work surface with a little flour. Roll out a third of the 500g pack of puff pastry to a 18 x 30cm strip and place on a non-stick baking sheet. Roll out the remainder of the 500g pack of puff pastry to about 28 x 36cm. Unravel the fillet from the cling film and sit it in the centre of the smaller strip of pastry. Beat the 2 egg yolks with 1 tsp water and brush the pastry’s edges, and the top and sides of the wrapped fillet. Using a rolling pin, carefully lift and drape the larger piece of pastry over the fillet, pressing well into the sides. Trim the joins to about a 4cm rim. Seal the rim with the edge of a fork or spoon handle. Glaze all over with more egg yolk and, using the back of a knife, mark the beef Wellington with long diagonal lines taking care not to cut into the pastry. Chill for at least 30 mins and up to 24 hrs.
Heat oven to 200C/fan 180C/gas 6. Brush the Wellington with a little more egg yolk and cook until golden and crisp – 20-25 mins for medium-rare beef, 30 mins for medium. Allow to stand for 10 mins before serving in thick slices.

~Enjoy!

Image © Tim Winter
Recipe from Good Food Magazine, Dec. 2004

Happy Hour Tuesday Special Drink: Ruby Tuesday

Rometti Limoncello Happy Hour Tuesday Ruby Tuesday

Happy Hour Tuesday!

This week we’re doubling up: just for this week, we are having a second recipe that screams SUMMER.  Made with seasonal fruit, it’s the perfect drink for this playful and bubbling season: ladies and gentlemen, here is Ruby Tuesday!

Ruby Tuesday is made with cherries, that it is suitable only during this time of the year when cherries are available. The name has been inspired by a Rolling Stones song, and just like the rock band it is a bold drink appreciated by both men and women.

It’s narrated that Ruby Tuesday was made on a Tuesday while listening to the homonymous song by Rolling Stones. This involuntarily soon-to-be-popular drink is made with rye whiskey, Benedictine, simple syrup, lemon juice and muddled cherries or puree cherries. We are also going to add just a splash or Rometti Limoncello to increase the citrusy flavor of the lemon juice while keeping all of its sweetness.

Ingredients:
1 ½ oz. rye whiskey
1 oz. Bénédictine
5 ripe black cherries
3/4 oz. splashes of Rometti Limoncello
Ice cubes
Tools: muddler, shaker, strainer
Glass: cocktail
Garnish: lemon twist

In the shaker base muddle the cherries. Add remaining ingredients and shake with ice. Strain into a chilled glass and garnish.

~Enjoy!

Cook N Bake Turkish Series: Sehriyeli Pilav

Rometti LImoncello Cook N Bake Series Rometti Limoncello  - Cook N Bake Turkish Series -  Sehriyeli Pilav

It can be boiled or steamed, with small and round or long, thin grain, and it surely is one of the most predominant ingredients in either western and eastern cuisines. So versatile to form compact breaded balls, yet again light and airy, sometimes crispy. This week’s dish is a manifesto of Turkish cuisine’s rice dishes, Sehriyeli Pilav, also known as Pilaf with Orzo.
In Turkish, pilaf means “lump of boiled rice”, although pilaf does not alway refer to dishes made with rice but also with other grains. As a matter of fact we often hear the word bulgur associated to pilaf: bulgur is a type of rice made from gluten-free wheat. Cous cous and cracked wheat can also make pilaf.
Born as a ceremonial dish, pilaf used to be served in Ottoman cerimonies with soups, dolma, meat, vegetables and sweets. A Turkish tradition is to serve a dish of pilaf, called sözkesen, at the end of the meal to indicate the meal completion.
Whether it is served with vegetables, seafood, meatballs, pistachios or dried fruit, pilaf is made with rice soaked in water, drained and fired in oil, water and salt. After the cooking it needs to rest for about 20 minutes, and then accompanied by meat, poultry, vegetables, or orzo. While the condiment is what determines the flavor of the dish, a good pilaf must have a good quality rice, which should not absorb too much water and the grains should not stick together.
Sehriyeli Pilav is a great source of protein to complete your meal, you can prepare it for a succulent Sunday meal or serve it as a complete, nutrient dinner on a weekly night. And if you make a little too much, don’t worry, it’ll taste even more flavorful the day after!

Ingredients:
2/3 cup orzo
1/2 cup long-grain white rice
1 medium onion finely chopped
2 carrots 1/4 inch dice
2 ribs of celery 1/4 inch dice
2 garlic cloves finely chopped
1 cup water
1 3/4 cups chicken broth
1/4 cup chopped fresh italian parsley
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon unsalted real butter
1/4 teaspoon salt or more to taste
1/4 teaspoon pepper or to taste
1 small zucchini if desired, 1/4 inch dice (1 1/4 cups)
1/4 cup slivered almonds toasted

Chop the onions, carrots, celery and garlic, parsley and zucchini if desired.
Heat the oil and butter in the skillet over medium heat, then saute the orzo, stirring it constantly until it is golden brown about one minute. Add the prepared vegetables (except the parsley and zucchini) and add the salt and pepper. Stir until the onion is lightly browned, then add the rice, saute and stir until coated with oil and butter.
Add the broth and the water and bring to a boil, lower the heat to low and cook covered, until liquid is absorbed, about 15 to 20 minutes. Avoid removing the lid and letting the steam escape. Remove from heat and quickly stir in the zucchini, and let it stand 5 minutes. Zucchini will steam. Then stir in the parsley and serve sprinkled with toasted almonds. Enjoy!

Recipe from http://www.justapinch.com
Image © Fénot

Cook N Bake German Series: Beef Rouladen

Rometti Limoncello Cook N Bake German Series Beef Rouladen

This week’s recipe come from one of the Southern states of Germany: Baden-Wuttemberg, one of the largest states in the country that confines with three other German states as well as with Austria and Switzerland. This is where the famous Black Forest is located, but also car makers such as Porsche, and Audi! As a matter of fact tourism and automobile industries are extremely important for Baden-Wuttemberg.
In terms of cooking, we find three different ways of cooking in this region: Baden Cooking, Franconian Cooking and Swabian Cooking. Soups and pasta are typical of the Swabian region; Bratwurst, cabbage and potatoes are popular in the Franconian Cooking; cheese, meat and cakes are typical of the Baden Cooking.
The dish that we selected from this state is called Beef Rouladen (the term comes from the French “rouler“, to roll): it a slice of beef rolled on a filling of bacon, onions, mustard and pickles, covered with wine stock and cooked. You can also use pork meat as a filling, or Black Forest Ham.
The origin of this dish is humble: in times of poverty all that people could grow in their garden was the main resource for cooking. Round steak, also known as rump steak was the cheapest meat you could findt, and the preparation was relatively easy. So easy – and inexpensive – that was made for German troops during the war, yet it became a Thanksgiving and Christmas dish.

Commonly served with potatoes, cabbage, or spatzle, and covered in gravy, this dish can be a delicious entree for both holiday dinners and Sunday gatherings.

Ingredients:

2 lb. Brisket or rump, beef, sliced thin
2 tbsp Mustard
1 – 2 Gherkin (sour pickles) or 1 dill pickle
1 Onion
2 Slices of bacon (about 40 grams Speck)
1/2 tbsp Butter (or Butterschmalz)
1/2 tbsp Oil (or Butterschmalz)
1 Carrot
1-2 Stalks celery
1/2 cups Dry red wine
Bay leaf
Salt and pepper
Fresh parsley for garnish

Slice the beef about 1/4 inch thick across the large surface. This can be done with a slicing machine or by the butcher, or by hand with a very sharp knife. This works best when the meat is partially frozen. Lay beef out flat.

Cut pickle lengthwise into strips, dice onion and bacon very fine.

Spread each slice with mustard, fill one end with 1 – 2 tablespoons of onion, 2 slices of pickle and some diced bacon.

Roll up from the filled end and tie with string (tie like you are wrapping a present or use a modified blanket stich), or use turkey lacers (in Germany they are called “Rouladennadel”) to keep them closed.

Melt the butter and oil in a saucepan or Dutch oven and brown the outside of the roulade in it.

Meanwhile, dice the carrot and celery.

Remove the roulades to a plate, add the “Suppengrün” or mirepoix and sauté for a few minutes, until soft. Place the beef rolls back on top of the vegetables, add a half cup of red wine and a little water, to make about 1/2 inch of liquid in the pan.

Add the bay leaf, 1/2 teaspoon of salt (depends on how salty the bacon is) and some grinds of pepper, cover and braise over low heat for two hours, or until beef is tender.

Remove beef roulades and keep warm. Puree sauce and thicken (optional) with a little cream, sour cream or “Wondra” (like Sossenbinder”) flour. Season to taste with more salt and pepper as needed. Place roulades back in sauce until serving time.

Serve with boiled potatoes (“Dampfkartoffeln” or parsley potatoes) or “Spaetzle” noodles and red cabbage.

~Enjoy!

Recipe from http://germanfood.about.com/od/meatbasedrecipesandmenu/r/Beef-Roulade.htm
Image © Cazals, Jean

Happy Hour Tuesday: Lemon Meringue Martini

Rometti Limoncello Happy Hour Tuesay Lemon Meringue Martini

Happy Hour Tuesday!

This week we are presenting a sweet, mouth-watering, heavenlicious drink: Lemon Meringue Martini. Yes, you heard me, it sounds like a dessert more than a drink, doesn’t it? And, trust me, it tastes like one too!

Although it is called “Lemon Meringue Martini“, there is no gin nor vermouth, however the presentation of the drink is a nod as its served in a Martini glass, which complements perfectly to the island-shape of the whipped cream shaped as a meringue. The main ingredient is Pinnacle Vodka, originally of France and well known because of its variety of flavors. For this particular cocktail we are going to use the Pinnacle Whipped, which as you can imagine has a whipped cream flavor. If some of you have never tasted it, it is worth a shot in the very sense of the word: this type of vodka is easy to drink by itself as well as it can be easily mixed with other liqueur.

The sweetness of the cream, mixed with the simple syrup gives that hint of meringue taste, with its typical sweetness and airiness which marry the crispiness of the citrusy flavor of limoncello.
Sometimes you are in the mood for sweets, other times you wish you’d be sipping on a drink, but if you want both and can’t make up your mind then here is the solution for you: Lemon Meringue Martini is what you are looking for when it’s too late for a snack and too early for dinner. It’s a sweet treat before or after dinner.

Ingredients:

2 oz Pinnacle Whipped Vodka
1 oz Rometti Limoncello
1 oz Half-and-Half Or Cream (you can also use a fat free cream)
1 oz Whipped Cream Topping
2 Meringues

In a plastic bag crush the meringues.
Add vodka, Rometti Limoncello, cream and simple syrup into a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Shake well and strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with the whipped cream topping and sprinkle some crushed meringues on top of it.

~Enjoy!

Image from: http://hungrycouplenyc.blogspot.com

Cook N Bake German Series: Dresden Stollen

Rometti Limoncello Cook N Bake German Series Dresden Stollen

The protagonist of this week’s Cook N Bake German Series is one of Germany’s newest states, created in 1990 after the Reunification. Very close to Brandenburg (of which we talked about last week), Poland and Czech Republic, Saxony is a green land enriched with forests, mountains, and river valleys.
Saxony’s culinary tradition can be easily summarized as Kaffeehauskultur, “coffee house culture”. Coffee and cakes are in fact the main recipes of the region. Although Germany did not have colonies where to grow coffee, that in the 17th century started becoming very popular throughout all Europe, Saxony soon became very proud of its weak cup of coffe, or Blumchenkaffee, “little flower coffee”. The name Blumchenkaffee originated with the introduction of the Meissen porcelain cups, made in Saxony and famous all over the world. At the bottom of these cups there is a painted flower decoration, which is still visible if the coffee poured into the cup is too weak.
Together with coffee, a piece of Stollen is often served. This week’s recipe is Dresden Stollen, a fruit cake containing dried fruit, nuts and spices, often covered in powdered sugar. Typical of the Christmas season (similarly to the Italian Panettone), a stollen can be called Dresden Stollen only if maid in Dresden, must contain at least 3 g of butter, 7 grams of dried fruit, candied orange and lemon peels, and 1 g o almonds. Originally it was made only with flour, oats and water, as the church doctrine banned the use of butter and milk during the Advent. Ernst of Saxony, together with his brother Albrecht, had to write to the Pope and request the ban to be lifted, from the moment that the cake without butter was quite tasteless. The Pope replied to the letter, known as the “butter letter” and since then butter was allowed for the cake.
Stollen appeared for the first time in 1427, when it was baked in the Saxon Royal Court. Dresden Stollen goes back to then, and in 1474 was the main sweet at the Dresden’s Christmas market, which still exists today and hosts a parade in which a carriage takes the Stollen through the streets of Dresden.

Ingredients:

For the Fruit:
1 cup mixed candied fruit
1 cup raisins
3 tablespoons dark rum or orange juice

For the Sponge:
1 scant tablespoon or 1 (1/4-ounce) package active dry yeast
1/4 cup warm water (about 110 degrees F)
2/3 cup milk
1 teaspoon honey
1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour

For the Dough:
1/3 cup honey
1 large egg, beaten
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened
1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground mace
1/2 cup chopped almonds, toasted
3 to 4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
Oil, for coating bowl

For the Filling:
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
3 tablespoons granulated sugar
For the Topping:
1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar

Prepare Fruit: Combine the mixed fruit, raisins, and rum. Cover and set aside. Shake or stir the mixture every so often to coat the fruit with the rum.

Prepare Sponge: In a large bowl, sprinkle the yeast in the water to soften. Heat the milk to 110 degrees F and add it to the yeast along with the honey and 1 cup flour. Cover the sponge with plastic wrap and let rise until light and full of bubbles, about 30 minutes.

By Hand: Add the fruit mixture, honey, egg, butter, zest, salt, mace, almonds, and 2 cups of the flour to the sponge. Beat vigorously for 2 minutes. Gradually add the remaining flour 1/4 cup at a time until the dough begins to pull away from the side of the bowl. Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface. Knead, adding flour a little at a time, until the dough is smooth and elastic.

By Mixer: In the mixer bowl, add the fruit mixture, honey, egg, butter, zest, salt, mace, almonds, and 2 cups of the flour to the sponge. Using the paddle, beat the mixture on medium low speed for 2 minutes. Gradually add the remaining flour 1/4 cup at a time until the dough begins to pull away from the side of the bowl. Change to the dough hook. Continue to add flour 1 tablespoon at a time until the dough just begins to clean the bowl. Knead 4 to 5 minutes on medium-low.

First rise: Put the dough in an oiled bowl and turn to coat the entire ball of dough with oil. Cover with a tightly woven towel and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour.

Shape and Fill: Turn the dough out onto a lightly oiled work surface. For 1 large loaf, roll the dough into a 9 by 13-inch oval. For 2 loaves, divided the dough in half and roll each half into a 7 by 9-inch oval. Brush the melted butter over the top of the oval(s). Combine the cinnamon and granulated sugar and sprinkle over one lengthwise half of the oval(s). Fold the dough in half lengthwise and carefully lift the bread(s) onto a parchment-lined or well-greased baking sheet. Press lightly on the folded side to help the loaf keep its shape during rising and baking.

Second rise: Cover with a tightly woven towel and let rise for 45 minutes.

Preheat oven: About 10 minutes before baking, preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Bake and cool: Bake for 25 minutes until the internal temperature of the bread reaches 190 degrees F. Immediately remove from the baking sheet and place on a rack to cool.

To serve: Sprinkle heavily with confectioners’ sugar just before serving.

Variation: Between 2 pieces of waxed paper or plastic wrap, roll 3 ounces almond paste or marzipan into the lengthwise shape of half the oval. Omit the butter and cinnamon-sugar filling. Place the marzipan on half of the oval and fold the dough in half. Let rise and bake as directed.

Notes: One cup coarsely chopped mixed dried fruits may be substituted for the candied fruit. Cover the dried fruit with boiling water and let sit at room temperature for 8 to 12 hours. Drain and use as you would candied fruit. You can also make your own candied fruit and peel. This bread freezes nicely for up to 6 months. If freezing it, do not sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar. To serve, first thaw the bread, then bake on a baking sheet in a preheated 375 degree F oven for 7 to 10 minutes. Just before serving, sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar.

Recipe from http://www.foodnetwork.com

Happy Hour Tuesday: Cranberry Lemon Martini

Rometti Limoncello Happy Hour Tuesday Cranberry Lemon Martini

Happy Hour Tuesday!

Have you checked your clocks, you know what that means: we are officially entering the Spring-Summer season, when the days are longer and the nights..well they can be long or short depending on how much fun you want to have 😉 If you love sunny days and are looking forward to the new season, if you can’t wait to enjoy happy hours with friends, family or colleges while the sun is still shining in the sky, then you will probable love this cocktail recipe, which we found on http://www.yoursouthernpeach.com.

Cranberry Lemon Martini is a fun, colorful and fruity version of the classic Martini. Martini is an alluring drink that has been playing a significant, fashionable role in the American cocktail history. The cone shaped glass is supposed to be both visually pleasant and functional: as a matter of fact its shape was introduced to keep the ingredients from separating, yet it also had the perfect opening to garnish with olives, which have become a recognizable symbol for Martinis.

Cranberry Lemon Martini can be as classy as it can be casual, an elegant drink to savor to the very last sip!
Ingredients:

3 oz Vodka
1 oz Rometti Limoncello
3 oz Pure Cranberry Juice
Lemon slices to garnish

Fill a cocktail shaker with ice. Pour vodka, Rometti Limoncello and cranberry juice over it, stir and strain into a Martini glass. Garnish with lemon.

~Enjoy!

Recipe by wwww.yoursouthernpeach.com
Image by Amy Mikkelsen