FridayLicious: Limoncello Cheesecake

Rometti Limoncello Fridaylicious Limoncello Cheesecake

Thank God It’s Friday… Thank God It’s Delicious!

Do you enjoy savoring a slice of cake with your coffee but don’t enjoy so much baking? Or, unfortunately for your husband and little ones, you would bake everything you could but your relationship with the oven is a love-hate affair that tends to lean a little bit more towards the “hate’? This Friday Rometti Limoncello has a delicious recipe for you that does not require baking: Limoncello Cheesecake. Well, there is a little baking, but it consists in only letting the crust sit!

Cheesecakes are very popular in the United States. If you ask around, some people will even tell you that Cheesecakes are an American invention, which is partially true and partially not. Believe it or not, the ancient Greek were already mastering the art of Cheesecakes, although at the time Cheesecakes were used for religious uses and had a very different taste. It took the introduction in 1872 of American cream cheese to develop the modern Cheesecake we all so love today. And once again, like for other cooking ingredients, cream cheese was nothing less than a mistake! In fact a dairyman called William Lawrence  from Chester, NY,  is the one to claim for such a popular dairy ingredient which he accidentally made while he was trying to reproduce the French Neufchatel cheese. Mr. Lawrence was the founder of Philadelphia brand Cream Cheese. The rest is history.

Just FYI shall you want to make this Limoncello Cheesecake a little more Italian-style, you can substitute cream cheese with ricotta.

Ingredients:
2 cups graham cracker crumbs
1/3 cup unsalted butter – melted
8 ounces cream cheese – softened
8 ounces frozen whipped topping – thawed
1/2 cup sour cream
1/4 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 cup Rometti Limoncello

Preheat oven oven to 350°F. Spray 9-inch glass pie plate with cooking spray. Stir together crust ingredients. Press firmly and evenly in bottom of pie plate.
Bake 9 minutes. Cool 20 minutes.
In the bowl of your mixer, beat cheesecake ingredients on medium speed until smooth; spoon over crust.
Refrigerate at least 30 minutes prior to serving.

~Enjoy!
Recipe and image copyright of Paula Jones with Bellalimento

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Fridaylicious: Limoncello and Raspberry Semi-freddo

Rometti Limoncello Fridaylicious Limoncello And Raspberry Semi-Freddo

Thank God It’s Friday, Thank God It’s Delicious!

Being Valentine’s Day, today we couldn’t help but looking for a lovely, tasteful dessert that would sweeten up your day (and/or night!). Although the cold weather is still letting some of us shivering and shaveling in most of the country, our selection fell on a classic and versatile Limoncello and Raspberry Semi-freddo.

Perfect for both after lunch and after dinner, semi-freddo is not as thick as ice-cream, its lighter richness makes it instead more similar to a mousse because made with half ice cream and half whipped cream. Visually more elegant than gelato, with its etherial consistency semi-freddo is often consumed as dessert, and suits perfectly every kind of dinner party.

Limoncello and Raspberry Semi-freddo is the perfect Valentine’s Day treat if you live in a sunny place, such as our beloved Newport Beach. But don’t worry, if you are in one of the regions still affected by the winter storm, this semi-freddo will bring you a little sunshine and works as a sweet excuse to have your partner warming you up while enjoying every bite of this delicious dessert! Happy Valentine’s Day!

Ingredients:
100 grams (3.5 oz) raspberries (fresh or frozen, thawed)
85 grams (3 oz) golden caster sugar
284 ml (1.2 cups) double cream (carton)
4 tbsps Rometti Limoncello
200 ml (0.95 cups) crème fraîche (cartons)
225 grams (8 oz) raspberries (fresh or frozen, thawed)
2 tbsps golden caster sugar
2 tbsps Rometti Limoncello
raspberries (extra)

Line the base of a 1kg loaf tin (7.5in x 4.75in x 3.5 deep) with baking parchment. For the semi-freddo, mash the raspberries and half the sugar in a bowl with a fork. Whisk the cream, the rest of the sugar and Rometti Limoncello to soft peaks. Beat the crème fraîche briefly so it is in soft peaks like the cream. Gently fold the cream mixture and crème fraîche together.
Pour the mashed raspberries into the cream and give a few stirs only – just enough to swirl it through the creamy mix. Pour the mixture into the loaf tin and smooth the top.
For the coulis, mash the raspberries, sugar and Rometti Limoncello with a fork, then push through a sieve.
Open-freeze  the semi-freddo then cover with cling film and foil and freeze for up to 1 month. Pour the sieved coulis into a rigid container and freeze for up to 1 month.
To serve, thaw the coulis in the fridge overnight. Thaw the semi-freddo in the fridge for 1 hr. Remove it from the tin and peel off the lining paper. Drizzle with a little of the coulis and scatter some raspberries over the top. Serve in slices with the rest of the coulis.

~Enjoy!

Recipes from http://www.yummly.com

Cook N Bake German Series: Münchner Apfelstrudel

Rometti Limoncello Cook n Bake German Series Munchen Apfelstrudel

The biggest state in the Southern part of Germany is Bavaria, bordered by Austria and Switzerland to the south and Czech Republic to the east. It’s a land of castles and churches surrounded by an unbelievably picturesque landscape with breathtaking mountains, such as the Alps. Birth place of Weisswurst, created in Munich in 1857, and Pretzel, Bavaria has become one of the main destinations for tourists, especially thanks also to its variety of festivals and traditions during the holidays. The Oktoberfest is the largest festival in the world.
Bavarian cuisine is based on lots of roasted meat, dumplings and flour based dishes. Being so close to Easter, we selected the famous Munich Apple Strudel (Münchner Apfelstrudel), an extremely popular pastry in Bavaria and also the rest of Germany.
Baked in a fireproof pan instead of a baking sheet like the Vienna apple strudel, the Munich Apple Strudel is a dough with the classic swirly look that has a filling made of chopped apples, raisins, roasted bread crumbs and cinnamon. Before baking, the filling is spread on the dough and rolled up into a log. Usually served warm alone or with some vaminna ice cream, the Apfelstrudel is an excellent holiday dessert, perfect for Christmas but incredibly successful throughout the year!

Ingredients:

Dough:
10−1/2 oz. bread flour
l/6 oz. salt
1−l/2 oz. vegetable oil
5−1/3 oz. water, lukewarm

Filling:
4−1/2 lb. apples, sliced
5−l/3 oz. granulated sugar
1−1/2 oz. dark rum
5−1/3 oz. raisins
1/8 tsp. ground cinnamon
2 lemons (juice and peel)
For the buttered breadcrumbs:
10−1/2 oz. butter (unsalted)
10−1/2 oz. bread crumbs

Knead flour, salt, oil and water into a medium−firm dough. Divide into 3 small round loaves, brush each loaf with melted butter and let sit for 1 hour.
Peel, core and slice apples. Mix in granulated sugar, raisins, grated lemon peel, lemon Juice, rum, cinnamon and blend together well.
Roll the dough loaves with a rolling pin, then stretch rolled dough on a strudel sheet with the backs of your hands.
Coat 2/3 of dough sheet with buttered breadcrumbs, spread apple filling over remaining 1/3 of dough.
Tear off edges, shape strudel into roll by lifting strudel sheet. Place strudel on a buttered baking sheet and brush with melted butter.
Bake strudel for 60 to 90 minutes in a 400F to 425F oven.

~Enjoy!

recipe from http://www.spatenbeer.com
image by David Murray

Happy Hour Tuesday: Lemon Meringue Martini

Rometti Limoncello Happy Hour Tuesay Lemon Meringue Martini

Happy Hour Tuesday!

This week we are presenting a sweet, mouth-watering, heavenlicious drink: Lemon Meringue Martini. Yes, you heard me, it sounds like a dessert more than a drink, doesn’t it? And, trust me, it tastes like one too!

Although it is called “Lemon Meringue Martini“, there is no gin nor vermouth, however the presentation of the drink is a nod as its served in a Martini glass, which complements perfectly to the island-shape of the whipped cream shaped as a meringue. The main ingredient is Pinnacle Vodka, originally of France and well known because of its variety of flavors. For this particular cocktail we are going to use the Pinnacle Whipped, which as you can imagine has a whipped cream flavor. If some of you have never tasted it, it is worth a shot in the very sense of the word: this type of vodka is easy to drink by itself as well as it can be easily mixed with other liqueur.

The sweetness of the cream, mixed with the simple syrup gives that hint of meringue taste, with its typical sweetness and airiness which marry the crispiness of the citrusy flavor of limoncello.
Sometimes you are in the mood for sweets, other times you wish you’d be sipping on a drink, but if you want both and can’t make up your mind then here is the solution for you: Lemon Meringue Martini is what you are looking for when it’s too late for a snack and too early for dinner. It’s a sweet treat before or after dinner.

Ingredients:

2 oz Pinnacle Whipped Vodka
1 oz Rometti Limoncello
1 oz Half-and-Half Or Cream (you can also use a fat free cream)
1 oz Whipped Cream Topping
2 Meringues

In a plastic bag crush the meringues.
Add vodka, Rometti Limoncello, cream and simple syrup into a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Shake well and strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with the whipped cream topping and sprinkle some crushed meringues on top of it.

~Enjoy!

Image from: http://hungrycouplenyc.blogspot.com

Cook N Bake German Series: Dresden Stollen

Rometti Limoncello Cook N Bake German Series Dresden Stollen

The protagonist of this week’s Cook N Bake German Series is one of Germany’s newest states, created in 1990 after the Reunification. Very close to Brandenburg (of which we talked about last week), Poland and Czech Republic, Saxony is a green land enriched with forests, mountains, and river valleys.
Saxony’s culinary tradition can be easily summarized as Kaffeehauskultur, “coffee house culture”. Coffee and cakes are in fact the main recipes of the region. Although Germany did not have colonies where to grow coffee, that in the 17th century started becoming very popular throughout all Europe, Saxony soon became very proud of its weak cup of coffe, or Blumchenkaffee, “little flower coffee”. The name Blumchenkaffee originated with the introduction of the Meissen porcelain cups, made in Saxony and famous all over the world. At the bottom of these cups there is a painted flower decoration, which is still visible if the coffee poured into the cup is too weak.
Together with coffee, a piece of Stollen is often served. This week’s recipe is Dresden Stollen, a fruit cake containing dried fruit, nuts and spices, often covered in powdered sugar. Typical of the Christmas season (similarly to the Italian Panettone), a stollen can be called Dresden Stollen only if maid in Dresden, must contain at least 3 g of butter, 7 grams of dried fruit, candied orange and lemon peels, and 1 g o almonds. Originally it was made only with flour, oats and water, as the church doctrine banned the use of butter and milk during the Advent. Ernst of Saxony, together with his brother Albrecht, had to write to the Pope and request the ban to be lifted, from the moment that the cake without butter was quite tasteless. The Pope replied to the letter, known as the “butter letter” and since then butter was allowed for the cake.
Stollen appeared for the first time in 1427, when it was baked in the Saxon Royal Court. Dresden Stollen goes back to then, and in 1474 was the main sweet at the Dresden’s Christmas market, which still exists today and hosts a parade in which a carriage takes the Stollen through the streets of Dresden.

Ingredients:

For the Fruit:
1 cup mixed candied fruit
1 cup raisins
3 tablespoons dark rum or orange juice

For the Sponge:
1 scant tablespoon or 1 (1/4-ounce) package active dry yeast
1/4 cup warm water (about 110 degrees F)
2/3 cup milk
1 teaspoon honey
1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour

For the Dough:
1/3 cup honey
1 large egg, beaten
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened
1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground mace
1/2 cup chopped almonds, toasted
3 to 4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
Oil, for coating bowl

For the Filling:
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
3 tablespoons granulated sugar
For the Topping:
1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar

Prepare Fruit: Combine the mixed fruit, raisins, and rum. Cover and set aside. Shake or stir the mixture every so often to coat the fruit with the rum.

Prepare Sponge: In a large bowl, sprinkle the yeast in the water to soften. Heat the milk to 110 degrees F and add it to the yeast along with the honey and 1 cup flour. Cover the sponge with plastic wrap and let rise until light and full of bubbles, about 30 minutes.

By Hand: Add the fruit mixture, honey, egg, butter, zest, salt, mace, almonds, and 2 cups of the flour to the sponge. Beat vigorously for 2 minutes. Gradually add the remaining flour 1/4 cup at a time until the dough begins to pull away from the side of the bowl. Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface. Knead, adding flour a little at a time, until the dough is smooth and elastic.

By Mixer: In the mixer bowl, add the fruit mixture, honey, egg, butter, zest, salt, mace, almonds, and 2 cups of the flour to the sponge. Using the paddle, beat the mixture on medium low speed for 2 minutes. Gradually add the remaining flour 1/4 cup at a time until the dough begins to pull away from the side of the bowl. Change to the dough hook. Continue to add flour 1 tablespoon at a time until the dough just begins to clean the bowl. Knead 4 to 5 minutes on medium-low.

First rise: Put the dough in an oiled bowl and turn to coat the entire ball of dough with oil. Cover with a tightly woven towel and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour.

Shape and Fill: Turn the dough out onto a lightly oiled work surface. For 1 large loaf, roll the dough into a 9 by 13-inch oval. For 2 loaves, divided the dough in half and roll each half into a 7 by 9-inch oval. Brush the melted butter over the top of the oval(s). Combine the cinnamon and granulated sugar and sprinkle over one lengthwise half of the oval(s). Fold the dough in half lengthwise and carefully lift the bread(s) onto a parchment-lined or well-greased baking sheet. Press lightly on the folded side to help the loaf keep its shape during rising and baking.

Second rise: Cover with a tightly woven towel and let rise for 45 minutes.

Preheat oven: About 10 minutes before baking, preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Bake and cool: Bake for 25 minutes until the internal temperature of the bread reaches 190 degrees F. Immediately remove from the baking sheet and place on a rack to cool.

To serve: Sprinkle heavily with confectioners’ sugar just before serving.

Variation: Between 2 pieces of waxed paper or plastic wrap, roll 3 ounces almond paste or marzipan into the lengthwise shape of half the oval. Omit the butter and cinnamon-sugar filling. Place the marzipan on half of the oval and fold the dough in half. Let rise and bake as directed.

Notes: One cup coarsely chopped mixed dried fruits may be substituted for the candied fruit. Cover the dried fruit with boiling water and let sit at room temperature for 8 to 12 hours. Drain and use as you would candied fruit. You can also make your own candied fruit and peel. This bread freezes nicely for up to 6 months. If freezing it, do not sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar. To serve, first thaw the bread, then bake on a baking sheet in a preheated 375 degree F oven for 7 to 10 minutes. Just before serving, sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar.

Recipe from http://www.foodnetwork.com

Cook N Bake Moroccan Series: Almond Briouats

Rometti Limoncello Cook N Bake Moroccan Series Almond Briouats

After four delicious yet filling Moroccan dishes, we hope that you still have a little bit of room for the last course of our Moroccan meal: Almond Briouats.
Moroccan cuisine presents a large variety of finger food, served as appetizers as well as entrees. Among the other dishes we find the extremely popular briouats, pastries made of the thin warga (a thin phyllo sheet, as seen in last week’s blog) filled with meat or fruit, folded in a triangular or cylindrical shape and then fried or baked. Powder sugar or spices are often sprinkled on top of them before serving.
Almond Briouats are one of the most popular versions, consumed both during special occasions and as an occasional snack with a cup of tea. This dish is simply addicting with its orange and cinnamon taste covered often with honey to increase the sweetness and savor.
If you don’t have warga we remind you that you can always use phillo dough, which you can cut in stripes and fold into triangles, or if you prefer you can roll up in cylinders (similar to spring rolls).

Make Almond Briouats for a house warming party, for your kids, as dessert after dinner, or simply as a snack that can always come handy during long work days. Wherever, whenever, it’s always time for a little Almond Briouat!
Ingredients:

For the Filling
1 kg (2 lb. 3 oz.) almonds
400 g (1 3/4 cup) granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon, or more to taste
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon mastic or gum arabic powder
125 g (1/2 cup) unsalted butter, softened
80 ml (1/3 cup) orange flower water

For Folding the Briouats
1 kg warqa
1/4 cup butter, melted
1 or 2 egg yolks

For Cooking the Briouats
vegetable oil, for frying
1.25 kg (45 oz.) honey
1 to 2 tablespoons orange flower water
Blanch and peel the almonds. Leave to dry thoroughly before proceeding.

Fry half of the blanched almonds. (Leave the other 1/2 kg of almonds raw.) To fry the almonds, heat about 1/4″ of vegetable oil in a deep skillet over medium heat. Fry the almonds in batches, stirring constantly, until light to medium golden brown. Each batch should take 5 minutes or longer, providing the oil isn’t too hot. Don’t allow the almonds to get any darker, as they’ll continue to color once removed from the oil. Transfer the almonds to a strainer or tray lined with paper towels and leave to cool.

Grind the almonds with the sugar. In a food processor, grind the fried almonds with about half of the sugar until they turn to paste. Turn out the almond paste into a bowl or onto a large tray, and repeat the grinding with the blanched almonds and remaining sugar.

Mix the almond paste filling. Combine the ground almonds and sugar with the cinnamon, salt, gum arabic powder, butter and orange flower water. Use your hands to mix and knead the paste thoroughly.

Shape the almond paste into balls. Roll all of the almond paste into equal-sized balls. For the small 5 cm briouats shown above, the balls were made cherry-sized. You can make them larger if you want a larger pastry.

Fold the briouats. Enclose each ball of almond paste in a strip of warqa dough. For cherry-sized balls, use approximately a 5 cm wide strip of dough.

Spread the center of the strip with a little melted butter and place the almond paste filling near the bottom. Wrap up the bottom of the dough to enclose the filling, and shape the triangle by folding the filling – up to the right and then left – until you reach the end of the dough. Each time you fold, you’ll be flipping the bottom corner of the triangle up to the opposite edge of the dough. Trim the excess dough to make a neat flap, dab a little egg yolk on the flap to help seal and tuck it into the fold.

Fry the briouats and soak them in honey. Heat 1/4″ to 1/2″ of oil in a deep frying pan. At the same time, heat 1 kg of honey mixed with 1 tablespoon of orange flower water in a second pot. Remove the honey from the heat when it is quite hot and becomes lightly foamy on top.

Fry the briouat in batches in the hot oil, stirring gently and turning over several times, until light golden brown. On average, this should take from 5 to 7 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer the fried pastries directly from the oil to the hot honey.

Soak the first batch of pastries in the hot honey while you fry the second batch of briouats. Occasionally submerge the briouats by pushing down on them gently. When the next batch of briouats is almost ready to be removed from the oil, transfer the ones which have been soaking in honey to a strainer.

As you work with the remaining batches of briouats the volume of honey will decrease as it’s absorbed by the pastries. You’ll find that instead of submerging the pastries, you’ll need to turn them over several times to ensure that they’re getting coated with honey. If the honey eventually seems to cool and thicken, heat it again to thin it. You can also add more honey to the pot if you find it easier to work that way.

Cool and store the briouats.

After the briouats have drained for a few minutes, transfer them to a platter or tray to finish cooling. Leave them for an hour or longer to cool thoroughly before storing.

The briouats can be kept in a tightly sealed container at room temperature for a month, or in the freezer for several months. If storing in the freezer, place a sheet of plastic wrap between layers to make it easy to remove only as many cookies as you need.

~Enjoy!

Recipe from http://moroccanfood.about.com
Image from http://friendseat.com

Happy Hour Tuesday: Strawberry Ricotta Gelato Fizz

Rometti Limoncello - Strawberry Ricotta Gelato Fizz

Happy Hour Tuesday!

Some days it seems like Happy Hour never comes soon enough. When you really need a break during a hard working afternoon, you might find it hard to make up your mind between having a drink or a snack. To satisfy both your thirst and food cravings Rometti has an incredible recipe for you to try: Strawberry Ricotta Gelato Fizz. Gelato is always a delicious, light and nutritious snack, and when you add some alcohol to it, the taste is even more effervescent.
Strawberry Ricotta Gelato Fizz has the sweetness of a dessert and the dryness of sparkling wine, yet the crispiness of the wine accentuates the fruity taste of ricotta. Finally the zesty flavor of Rometti Limoncello highlights the cider aroma of Prosecco.
Make some of these eat-and-drink treats in advance to be able to enjoy them anytime of day.

Ingredients (makes 6 servings):

For the Strawberry Ricotta Gelato:
2 cups whole-milk ricotta cheese
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla paste or vanilla extract
Zest of 2 lemons
2 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
2 Tbsp Rometti Limoncello
1 cup milk
1 cup finely chopped strawberries

For the Lemon Strawberry Sauce:
1/2 pint strawberries, rinsed and dried
1/3 cup (1 3/8 ounces) confectioners’ sugar + more to taste
2 tablespoons Rometti Limoncello
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
Pinch table salt
1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
Prosecco, Cava or sparkling water

In the bowl of a food processor fitted with a metal blade, place ricotta, sugar, vanilla paste or extract, lemon zest, lemon juice and Rometti Limoncello. Process until smooth. Scrape down the sides of the processor bowl with a silicone spatula. Add milk and process again until thoroughly blended.
Transfer mixture to an ice cream machine and process according to manufacturer’s instructions.
Add chopped strawberries after ice cream is finished and run machine until they are just incorporated. Remove finished product from maker and put into freezer safe container.
Freeze at least 4 hours.

Put the strawberries, confectioners’ sugar, limoncello or vodka, lemon juice and salt in a blender or food processor and pulse until smooth and well blended. Taste and add more confectioners’ sugar or liqueur accordingly. Strain the mixture through a fine mesh sieve over a small bowl or 2-cup measure, pressing firmly on the seeds. Discard the seeds. Stir in the lemon zest and cover and refrigerate until ready to serve or up to 3 days.
Before serving, mix the strawberry mixture with an equal amount of Prosecco and stir until blended. Fill the glass with the strawberry mixture and serve with a spoon.
We found this unbelievable, packed-with-flavor recipe Creative Culinary (http://www.creative-culinary.com/2012/08/strawberry-ricotta-gelato-prosecco/). We hope you love it as much as we do!

~ENJOY!

Happy Hour Tuesday: Limoncello Granita with Raspberry Sauce

Rometti Limoncello - Happy Hour Tuesday- Limoncello Granita

Happy Hour Tuesday!

After surviving the end of the world,, wrapping an uncountable amount of gifts, and packing for a Christmas holiday break, Rometti is finally back! The decorations are gone and our house looks a little empty without the Christmas tree, but we are ready to start this year in a fresh and bubbly way!
As soon as Christmas is over, it almost seems so natural to start looking forward to the Spring and Summer months. It might still be cold outside but if we close our eyes we can surely imagine the sunshine and those bright, playful colors that the snow has been covering up with its white mantel. If like us you want to anticipate the warmth of the Summer months then it’s time to start making some Limoncello Granita with Fresh Raspberry Sauce!

For this of you who are not so familiar with granita, it is a water and sugar semi-frozen dessert typical of Sicily, Italy. There are different consistency of granita throughout Italy, but the most common one has a tiny, little, crystalline ice texture. Granita can be served by itself or mixed with other ingredients, like coffee or almonds. So why not mix it with Rometti Limoncello and turn it into a delicious drink!, just ilke Jennifer from Spoon With Me suggests.

To make Limoncello Granita you just need to make a sugar and water syrup, to which we’ll add long strips of lemon zest, lemon juice and Rometti Limoncello. A puree of raspberries will increase the consistency and give it an inviting, fun color.

Ingredients for the Granita:

6 Lemons
2/3 Cup sugar
5 Tbsp Rometti Limoncello
2 Cups water

Peel the lemons to make long, thin strips. Use the same lemons to make 1 cup of fresh, lemon juice.
Heat 2 cups of water with the 2/3 cup sugar over a medium-high heat. Stir until dissolved. Add lemon zest, and simmer for 30 additional seconds. Stir in Rometti Limoncello and the lemon juice. Let it cool at room temperature for 30 minutes.
Discard the zest and strain the mixture into a baking pan to place into the freezer. After 45 minutes scrape the first ice crystals with a fork. Put it back into the freezer and repeat scraping every 20-30 minutes until the liquid is all granular.
When it is time to serve, in each glass place some raspberries and cover them with the granita. On top add some rasperry sauce and decorate with fresh raspberries and lemon zest.

~Enjoy

Recipe and image from http://sponwithme.com

Cook N Bake Spanish Series: Bunyols de Carabassa

Cook N Bake Spanish Series Buñuelo

Dear Reader,

If last week you were anxiously waiting for a brand new Spanish recipe, we apologize for having skipped our Cook N Bake blog! Rometti decided at the last minute to take time off for Thanksgiving, but to make up for it we will soon have reviews of some great places that we experienced during this past holiday weekend.

This week we are making the last stop of our trip throughout Spain, and for the occasion we are going to order dessert: some cheerful, crispy Bunyols.

Bunyols, also known as Buñuelos, are a typical sweet from the Valencian region, located on the Spanish East coast. Built around one of the largest ports in the Mediterranean, Valencia, this region couldn’t help but being in contact with foreign populations and cultures, and its cuisine was influenced in some part by Arabian traditions, Moorish to be specific.
As a matter of fact, the first traces of Bunyols recipes date back to the XVI century, when the Moorish apparently introduced them to Spain. Bunyols were also popular in Italy though, as documented by a recipe written by a roman gastronome in the I century a.C!
Bunyols are fried dough-balls covered with sugar, often associated with Las Fallas, a traditional celebration of Saint Joseph which takes place in Valencia in March. You can find Bunyols also around the month of November, when they are cooked in occasion of the All-Saints holiday. So yes, they are perfect for this holiday season!
Although Bunyols have become a traditional treat throughout Spain, Valencia’s most typical Bunyol is the Bunyol de Carabassa, with the addition of pumpkin in the dough. These Bunyols are simply delicious if savored with a cup of hot chocolate on the side.

Ingredients:

2 kg (about 4.5 lb) of pumpkin
10 g (3.5 oz) of yeast
1 kg (2.2 lb) of flour
1 litre of water (34 oz)
Olive oil
250 g (9 oz) of sugar

Roast the pumpkin and puree it until it becomes a soft paste.
Take the flour and add water, sugar and yeast. Don’t forget that yeast works better if you mix it with some warm water until it starts foaming! Finally, add the pumpking paste to it and work it until you get a consistent dough.

Let the dough rest for a while in a warm corner, covered with a wet towel.

After about two hours, or until the dough has doubled in size, start forming little balls which you will then fry into a frying pan with hot oil. They need to stay in the oil for about 30 seconds, until they are gold.
Decorate the Bunyols by sprinkling some sugar on top of them. Consume them alone or with some hot chocolate.

~Enjoy!

Happy Hour Tuesday: Sgroppino al Limone

Rometti Limoncello - Sgroppino al Limone

Happy Hour Tuesday!

During Thanksgiving week you with undoubtedly spend a significate time in the kitchen. Between the stuffing, the cranberry sauce. the gravy, mashpotatoes and pumpkin pies, you better get your hands to work and your stomach to empty because on Thursday evening no matter what you will probably be stuck on the couch with a full belly and heavy eyes. But don’t discourage, knowing that the major strength of this week for both hosts and guest is indeed to consume such an abundant meal, Rometti has something for you that won’t take you more than five minutes to prepare and surely will help your digestion at every sip: Sgroppino al Limone.

Sgroppino al Limone is a frothy lemon drink made with a base of vodka and the addition of Prosecco and Rometti Limoncello. Sgroppino, which it’s said to have originated in Venice back in 1528 as a drink to consume in between courses to cleanse the palate, is not to be confused with a sorbet. As a matter of fact, Sgroppino is liquid, and sorbet is a frozen fruity ice cream made without dairy! But Sgroppino still has sorbet among the ingredients, and that is because sorbet has been around for ages and evolved into a more sophisticated, alcoholic version called “sgropin” in Venice, thus Sgroppino.

If you have already started or if you are just about to start preparing a magnificent Thanksgiving dinner, we recommend that you take those extra five minutes before serving to prepare this delicious Sgroppino al Limone… you will be thankful for it!

Ingredients: (serves 4)

2 cups good-quality lemon sorbet, softened
2 tablespoons vodka
1/3 cup Prosecco wine, chilled
4 tbsp Rometti Limoncello
mint to garnish

Chill the champagne flutes.
Whisk the lemon sorbet until smooth. Gradually whisk in vodka, Prosecco and Rometti Limocnello. Make sure you don’t whisk it too much or it’ll be too liquid. Serve into the chilled champagne flutes and garnish with a mint leaf.

~Enjoy!